dabblingwiththecaptain

tiniestofthesams:

hpotterobsession:

I love Alan Rickman. J.K. Rowling told him Snape’s entire background story before they filmed the first movie so that he would understand Snape’s character, now watching these movies a second or third+ time is so great, because then you see strange or subtle little things Snape does, facial expressions, odd glances, ect, and you can be like “Thats why he did that!”

Like here, he sees Harry, and you can tell he is noticing how much he resembles his father, but there is no doubt that he also saw Lily’s eyes there too, then he notices that Harry’s scar is bothering him, and looks suspiciously at Quirrel because he knows he could be up to something. He already hates Harry so much because he’s a constant reminder of the love he lost and who he lost her to, and yet he tries to keep him safe from the first second he sees him. He doesn’t even have to think about it, he sees that something could put Lily’s son in danger and he instantly starts to put the pieces together to keep him safe.

RULE NUMER ONE: EVERYTIME YOU SEE THIS IN YOUR DASH YOU HAVE TO REBLOG IT.

Not a fan of Snape as a character BUT DAT ACTING DOE

andrewquo
Biology’s cruel joke goes something like this: As a teenage body goes through puberty, its circadian rhythm essentially shifts three hours backward. Suddenly, going to bed at nine or ten o’clock at night isn’t just a drag, but close to a biological impossibility. Studies of teenagers around the globe have found that adolescent brains do not start releasing melatonin until around eleven o’clock at night and keep pumping out the hormone well past sunrise. Adults, meanwhile, have little-to-no melatonin in their bodies when they wake up. With all that melatonin surging through their bloodstream, teenagers who are forced to be awake before eight in the morning are often barely alert and want nothing more than to give in to their body’s demands and fall back asleep. Because of the shift in their circadian rhythm, asking a teenager to perform well in a classroom during the early morning is like asking him or her to fly across the country and instantly adjust to the new time zone — and then do the same thing every night, for four years.

Sleep and the teenage brain (via explore-blog)

This is why you have every right to be tired.  

(via lookrainbows)